Charity Ngilu Politician

Charity ngilu

Charity Kaluki Ngilu (born 1952) is a Kenyan politician. She was Minister of Health from 2003 until 2007 and was appointed as Minister of Water and Irrigation in April 2008. Ngilu was born in Mbooni, Makueni District in 1952. She was educated at Alliance Girls High School, then worked as a secretary for Central Bank of Kenya, before becoming an entrepreneur. She acted as a director of a plastics extrusion factory. In Kenya's first ever multiparty elections held in 1992, Charity Ngilu pulled off a big surprise by capturing the Kitui central constituency seat on the Democratic Party ticket. In the December 1997 general election, she ran for the presidency and along with Wangari Maathai became the first ever female presidential candidates in Kenya. Ngilu then represented the Social Democratic Party of Kenya. She finished fifth. Later, she joined National Party of Kenya. In the December 2002 general election, her party was part of the National Rainbow Coalition (NARC). The coalition went on to win the elections, and President Mwai Kibaki appointed her as Minister of Health when he named his Cabinet on January 3, 2003.

Personal details

Date of birth
1952
Place of birth
Kenya
Nationality
Kenya

Education

1. Alliance Girls High School Educational Institution

Alliance Girls' High School is a national girls school with boarding facilities located in the small town of Kikuyu in the Kiambu District of the Central Province of Kenya, 20 km away from the central Nairobi. It is walking distance from its brother school Alliance High School.

Headquarters
Kikuyu, Kiambu County
Official web page www.alliancegirlshigh.com
Wikipedia article

People attended Alliance Girls High School connected by profession and/or age

2. St. Paul's University Colleges/University

Headquarters
PRIVATE BAG, Limuru
Official web page www.spu.ac.ke

Political engagements

National Rainbow Coalition

Geographic scope

Kenya

Ideology

Conservatism

Founders

Wikipedia article

The National Rainbow Coalition was a coalition of Kenyan political parties in power from 2002 and 2005 when it fell apart in a controversy between its wings about a constitutional referendum.

Other members

born 1927

Orange Democratic Movement

Geographic scope

Kenya

Ideology

Social democracy

Official web page

Wikipedia article

Orange Democratic Movement refers to a political party in Kenya, which is the successor of a former grassroots people's movement which was formed in the 2005 Kenyan constitutional referendum. The erstwhile single party which separated in August 2007 into two. The two parties are the Orange Democratic Movement Party of Kenya, and the Orange Democratic Movement – Kenya. The name "orange" originates from the ballot cards in the referendum, in which a 'Yes' vote was represented by the banana and a 'No' vote was the orange. Thus the parties claim successorship to those who did not support the referendum at the time. The original linchpins of the ODM were Uhuru Kenyatta's KANU party and Raila Odinga's LDP. However, KANU has since pulled out, and the two groupings are headed by Raila Odinga and Kalonzo Musyoka.

Other members

born 1945

Democratic Party

Geographic scope

Kenya

Ideology

Conservatism

Founders

Official web page

Wikipedia article

The Democratic Party is a conservative political party in Kenya. At the legislative elections, 27 December 2002, the party was a partner in the National Rainbow Coalition, that won 56.1% of the popular vote and 125 out of 210 elected seats. The party itself took 36 of these seats. At the presidential elections of the same day, the party supported Mwai Kibaki, who won 62.2% and was elected. Kibaki is the leader of the DP. At the Kenyan general election, 2007, Democratic Party is part of the Party of National Unity led by President Mwai Kibaki in the chaotic 2007 general election and one of its members, Wilfred Machage, was named a cabinet minister in the half cabinet which Kibaki named prior to the formation of the Grand Coalition government.

Wikipedia

Check Charity Ngilu on wikipedia.

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