Frank McManus Politician

Francis Patrick Vincent McManus (27 February 1905 – 28 December 1983), Australian politician, was the last leader of the parliamentary Democratic Labor Party and a prominent figure in Australian politics for 30 years. McManus was born in North Melbourne, into a working-class family of Irish Catholic background. He was educated at Christian Brothers schools and the University of Melbourne (B.A.Hons.Dip.Ed.), where he graduated in arts and education, and became a school teacher. Later he became an official in the Victorian Department of Education. In 1950 McManus was appointed Assistant State Secretary of the Australian Labor Party. The Victorian Branch of the party was then under the control of right-wing forces aligned with B.A. Santamaria's secretive anti-communist "Movement." In this position McManus supported the Industrial Groups which the party had set up within trade unions to combat the influence of the Communist Party of Australia. After Labor's defeat in the 1954 federal election, the federal Leader, Dr H.V.

Personal details

Date of birth
February 27th, 1905
Nationality
Australia
Date of death
December 28th, 1983 at age of 78
Place of death
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Political engagements

Democratic Labor Party

1957-

Geographic scope

Australia

Wikipedia article

The Democratic Labor Party was an Australian political party. The party came into existence in 1955 as the Australian Labor Party, was renamed the Democratic Labor Party in 1957 and continued to exist until 1978.

Other members

born 1901
born 1910

Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist)

-1957

Geographic scope

Australia

Wikipedia article

The Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist) was the name initially used by the right-wing group which split away from the Australian Labor Party in 1955, and which later became the Democratic Labor Party in 1957. In April 1955, seven Victorian federal MPs and eighteen state MPs were expelled from the ALP, and they formed the party under the influence of B. A. Santamaria. All but one of the twelve MPs in the Victorian Legislative Assembly, the one MP facing re-election in the Victorian Legislative Council, and all seven federal MPs were defeated at elections held in 1955. Five MPs remained in the Legislative Council until the expiry of their terms in 1958, and all who recontested their seats were defeated. The federal MPs were: Tom Andrews Bill Bourke Bill Bryson Jack Cremean Bob Joshua Stan Keon Jack Mullens However, the party did elect Frank McManus as a senator for Victoria in this election, and successful ALP candidate George Cole had chosen before the election to become part of this party. Additionally, Frank Scully gained the seat of Richmond in the Victorian Legislative Assembly in the May 1955 Victorian election.

Other members

born 1878
born 1898
born 1900
born 1913

Democratic Labour Party

Geographic scope

Australia

Ideology

Social conservatism
Anti-capitalism
Anti-communism

Official web page

Wikipedia article

The Democratic Labour Party is a political party in Australia of the labour tradition that espouses social conservatism and opposes neo-liberalism. The first DLP Senator in decades and a blacksmith by trade, John Madigan was elected for a six-year term to the Australian Senate with 2.3 per cent of the primary vote in Victoria at the 2010 federal election, who served from July 2011, before resigning from the party and becoming an independent in September 2014, citing long-term internal party tensions. On 27 June 2013, the Australian Electoral Commission approved a change in the spelling of the party's name from "Democratic Labor Party" to "Democratic Labour Party".

Other members

born 1901

Goverment positions 1

Australian Senator

1956-1962
1965-1974

Legislative sessions

22nd Australian Parliament
23rd Australian Parliament
24th Australian Parliament
25th Australian Parliament
26th Australian Parliament
27th Australian Parliament
28th Australian Parliament

Area represented

Victoria

An Australian Senator is a member of the Australian Senate.

Other position holders

1951-1953
1951-1953
1952-1965
1953-1975
1958-1970
1958-1974
1962-1981
1962-1968

Wikipedia

Check Frank McManus on wikipedia.

Facebook comments