John Cummins Politician

John cummins 1

John Martin Cummins (born March 12, 1942) is a Canadian politician. He is currently the leader of the British Columbia Conservative Party. He was the Conservative Member of Parliament for the riding of Delta—Richmond East in British Columbia. Born in Georgetown, Ontario, he was first elected to the House of Commons in the 1993 election, as a Reform Party member. He was re-elected in 1997, 2000 (as a member of the Canadian Alliance), 2004, 2006, and 2008 (as a Conservative). Cummins obtained a bachelor’s degree from the University of Western Ontario where he attended King's University College and a master’s degree from the University of British Columbia. Before entering politics, Cummins worked in the pulp and paper industry in Ontario, the oil fields of Alberta and on the construction of the Bennett hydroelectric dam in Northern BC. He taught school in the Northwest Territories and in the Peace River district of Northern Alberta, then spent fifteen years teaching in Delta, British Columbia. Cummins is also a commercial fisherman; he owned and operated commercial fishing boats in BC for over 20 years.

Personal details

Date of birth
March 12th, 1942
Nationality
Canada
Religion
Catholicism
Places lived
Richmond , Canada
pop. 174,460 (2006)
Delta , Canada

Family

Spouse

Education

1. King's University College Colleges/University

This article refers to the King's College in London, Ontario.

Type Public university
Institution colors
Founded
1954
Headquarters
266 Epworth Avenue, N6A 2M3 - London, Ontario
Official web page www.uwo.ca
Wikipedia article

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by gender

People attended King's University College connected by profession and/or age

b. 1952., Politician

2. University of Western Ontario Colleges/University

The University of Western Ontario, commonly referred to as Western, is a public research university located in London, Ontario, Canada. The university's main campus covers 455 hectares (1,120 acres) of land, with the Thames River running through the eastern portion. Western administers a wide variety of academic programs between 12 faculties, professional schools and three affiliated university colleges.

Institution info

Type Public university
Endowment
2011. 362 mil. $
2010. 319 mil. $
Institution colors
Founded
1878
Headquarters
1151 Richmond Street, N6A 3K7 - London, Ontario
Undergraduates
2011. 22,755
2010. 30,300
Postgraduates
2011. 4,770
2010. 4,700
2009. 4,419
Acceptance rate
2010. 58.0 %
Local tuition
2013. 7.12 K $
Official web page www.uwo.ca
Wikipedia article
Social media

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by career
Notable alumni by gender

People attended University of Western Ontario connected by profession and/or age

b. 1943., Politician
b. 1940., Politician
b. 1947., Politician
b. 1938., Politician
b. 1944., Politician
b. 1941., Politician
b. 1944., Politician
b. 1942., Politician

Political engagements

Canadian Alliance

Geographic scope

Canada

Ideology

Fiscal conservatism
Social conservatism
Conservatism
Right-wing populism

Wikipedia article

The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. The party was the successor to the Reform Party of Canada and inherited its position as the Official Opposition in the House of Commons and held it throughout its existence. The party supported policies that were both fiscally and socially conservative, seeking reduced government spending on social programs and reductions in taxation. The Alliance was created out of the United Alternative initiative launched by the Reform Party and several provincial Tory parties as a vehicle to merge with the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. The federal PC Party rebuffed the initiative to "unite the right" in the late fall of 1998 when it elected Joe Clark as its leader. In December 2003, the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative parties voted to disband and merge into the Conservative Party of Canada.

Other members

born 1949
born 1949
born 1950
born 1952

Reform Party of Canada

Geographic scope

Canada

Ideology

Social conservatism
Populism
Right-wing populism
Conservatism
Libertarianism

Founders

Wikipedia article

The Reform Party of Canada was a right-wing populist federal political party in Canada that existed from 1987 to 2000. The party was directly succeeded by the Canadian Alliance in 2000, which merged with the Progressive Conservative Party in 2003 to form the modern-day Conservative Party of Canada. The Reform Party was founded as a Western Canada-based protest party, but attempted to expand eastward in the 1990s. It viewed itself as a populist party. Soon after its formation it moved to the right and became a populist conservative party. Initially, the Reform Party was motivated by the need for democratic reforms and by profound Western Canadian discontent with the Progressive Conservative federal government of Brian Mulroney. Led by its founder Preston Manning, the Reform Party rapidly gained momentum in western Canada and sought to expand its base in the east. Manning, son of longtime Alberta Premier Ernest Manning, gained support partly from the same political constituency as his father's old party, the Social Credit Party of Alberta.

Other members

born 1949
born 1950
born 1952
born 1957

British Columbia Conservative Party

Geographic scope

Canada

Ideology

Conservatism

Founders

Official web page

Wikipedia article

The British Columbia Conservative Party is a political party in British Columbia, Canada. First elected as the government in 1903, the party went into decline after 1933. On July 18, 2013, John Cummins resigned from the position of party leader. Dan Brooks was elected the new leader of the party on April 12, 2014.

Other members

born 1870
born 1949

Conservative Party of Canada

Geographic scope

Canada

Ideology

Social conservatism

Founders

Official web page

Wikipedia article

The Conservative Party of Canada, colloquially known as the Tories, is a political party in Canada which was formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance, and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in 2003. It is positioned on the right of the Canadian political spectrum. The party came to power in the 2006 federal election as a minority government, a position it maintained after the 2008 election, before winning its first majority government in 2011.

Other members

born 1939
born 1939
born 1940
born 1941
born 1943
born 1943
born 1944
born 1944

Goverment positions 1

Member of the Canadian House of Commons

1994-1997
1997-2004
2004-

Legislative sessions

35th Canadian Parliament
36th Canadian Parliament
37th Canadian Parliament
38th Canadian Parliament
39th Canadian Parliament
40th Canadian Parliament

Area represented

Delta
Delta—Richmond East
Delta—South Richmond

The House of Commons comprises 308 members (the number will rise to 338 in the next election), each of whom represents a single electoral district (also called a riding). The constitution specifies a basic minimum of 295 electoral districts, but additional seats are allocated according to various clauses. Seats are distributed among the provinces in proportion to population, as determined by each decennial census, subject to the following exceptions made by the constitution. Firstly, the "senatorial clause" guarantees that each province will have at least as many MPs as Senators. Secondly, the "grandfather clause" guarantees each province has at least as many Members of Parliament now as it had in 1985.

Other position holders

1988-1997
1988-2000
1988-1993
1990-2004
1996-
1996-2008
1997-

Wikipedia

Check John Cummins on wikipedia.

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