Maxine Nightingale Rhythm and blues Artist

Maxine nightingale

Maxine Nightingale (born 2 November 1952; Wembley, London) is a British R&B and soul music singer. She is best known for her hits in the 1970s, with the million seller "Right Back Where We Started From" (1975, U.K. & 1976, U.S.), "Love Hit Me" (1977), and "Lead Me On" (1979). One of the three children of comedian Benny Nightingale and his wife Iris - the couple having another daughter Rosalind & a son Glen - Maxine Nightingale began singing at age 16 with her school band, displaying sufficient vocal prowess to begin performing in London area venues with her brother Glen on guitar. In 1969 — the year she turned 17 — Nightingale joined the cast of the West End production of Hair; the same year she made her first recordings, vocalizing on the Pye singles "Talk to Me" and "Don't Push Me Baby" which were released under the name Nighttime Flyer. "Don't Push Me Baby" was issued by Pye's Australian distributor Astor in Nightingale's own name; her first UK release as Maxine Nightingale was in 1971 with the Pye single "Love on Borrowed Time".

Personal details

Date of birth
November 2nd, 1952
Nationality
England
Places lived
Wembley , United Kingdom

Music albums

Album title Release date Release type Recording type Recording length Additional artists Contributors
Night Life
1977
Right Back Where We Started From
1976 Album on gramophone record

Movie performances

1. American Soul: Vol. 2 (2007)

Runtime Producers Directors Writers Top cast Awards Budget Movie on internet
60.0

Awards

Top cast

2. Superstars of '70s Soul Live (2004)

Runtime Producers Directors Writers Top cast Awards Budget Movie on internet
93.0

Awards

Top cast

Guest TV appearances

American Bandstand

Program genre

Music
Variety show
Talk show

External resources

American Bandstand is an American music-performance show that aired in various versions from 1952 to 1989 and was hosted from 1956 until its final season by Dick Clark, who also served as producer. The show featured teenagers dancing to Top 40 music introduced by Clark; at least one popular musical act—over the decades, running the gamut from Jerry Lee Lewis to Run DMC—would usually appear in person to lip-sync one of their latest singles. Freddy Boom Boom Cannon holds the record for most appearances at 110.
Appearance history
Epizode Air date Role Writer Director
S22-E41 July 28th, 1979
S19-E44 July 17th, 1976

The Midnight Special

Program genre

Variety show

External resources

The Midnight Special is an American late-night musical variety series that aired on NBC during the 1970s and early 1980s, created and produced by Burt Sugarman. It premiered as a special on August 19, 1972, then began its run as a regular series on February 2, 1973; its last episode was on May 1, 1981. The ninety-minute program followed the Friday night edition of The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.nLike its syndicated late-night cousin Don Kirshner's Rock Concert, the show typically featured guest hosts, except for a period from July 1975 through March 1976 when singer Helen Reddy served as the regular host. Wolfman Jack served as the announcer and frequent guest host.
Appearance history
Epizode Air date Role Writer Director
S07-E34 September 7th, 1979

Wikipedia

Check Maxine Nightingale on wikipedia.

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