Oliver Cromwell Military Commander

Oliver cromwell

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader who was part of the joint republican, military and parliamentarian effort that overthrew the Stuart monarchy as a result of the English Civil War, and was subsequently invited by his fellow leaders to assume a head of state role in 1653. As such, Cromwell ruled as "Lord Protector" for a five-year segment (1653–58) of the 11-year period of republican Commonwealth and protectorate rule of England, and nominally of Ireland, Wales and Scotland. As one of the commanders of the New Model Army, he played an important role in the defeat of the King's forces, the royalists in the English Civil War. After the execution of King Charles I in 1649, Cromwell dominated the short-lived Commonwealth of England, conquered Ireland and Scotland, ruling as Lord Protector from 1653 until his death in 1658. Cromwell was born into the ranks of the middle gentry, and remained relatively obscure for the first 40 years of his life. Along with his brother, Henry, he kept a small holding of chickens and sheep, selling eggs and wool to support himself.

Personal details

Date of birth
April 25th, 1599
Nationality
The Protectorate,Kingdom of England
Date of death
September 3rd, 1658 at age of 59
Place of death
Whitehall
Cause of death
Malaria
Religion
Puritan

Family

Parents
Siblings
Spouse
Children

Education

1. Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge Colleges/University

Sidney Sussex College (often referred to informally as "Sidney") is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England.

Endowment
2010. 542 K £
Institution colors
Headquarters
Sidney Street, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire
Undergraduates
2009. 380
Postgraduates
2009. 135
Acceptance rate
2010. 22.0 %
Local tuition
2012. 9 K £
Official web page www.sid.cam.ac.uk
Wikipedia article

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by career
Notable alumni by gender

People attended Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge connected by profession and/or age

b. 1604., Scientist
b. 1594., Writer
b. 1602., Noble person
b. 1595., Writer
b. 1903., Academic
b. 1869., Physicist
b. 1956., Politician
b. 1934., Dramatist

2. Hinchingbrooke School Educational Institution

Hinchingbrooke School is a large school situated on the outskirts of Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire. Originally all of the surrounding land—including what is now Huntingdon Town—comprised the grounds of Hinchingbrooke House. In fact, the Town was given the name "Huntingdon" as the owners of the house were known for hosting magnificent hunting parties. There is still an avenue of trees leading from the start of Hinchingbrooke House towards the town, which was the old entranceway through the grounds. It is now an academy.

Type Academy
Founded
1565
Headquarters
Brampton Road, PE29 3BN - Huntingdon, East of England
Official web page www.hinchingbrookeschool.net
Wikipedia article

People attended Hinchingbrooke School connected by profession and/or age

b. 1633., Author

3. University of Cambridge Colleges/University

The University of Cambridge (informally known as Cambridge University or Cambridge) is a public research university located in Cambridge, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after the University of Oxford), and the seventh-oldest in the world. In post-nominals the university's name is abbreviated as Cantab, a shortened form of Cantabrigiensis (an adjective derived from Cantabrigia, the Latinised form of Cambridge).

Institution info

Type Public university
Endowment
2013. 4.9 bil. £
Institution colors
Founded
1209
Headquarters
Trinity Lane, CB2 1TN - Cambridge, United Kingdom
Undergraduates
2012. 11,941
2011. 12,077
2009. 12,192
2004. 12,018
Postgraduates
2012. 6,246
2011. 6,371
Acceptance rate
2012. 21.9 %
Local tuition
2013. 9 K £
2012. 9 K £
Official web page www.cam.ac.uk
Wikipedia article
Social media

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by career
Notable alumni by gender
Notable alumni by party membership

People attended University of Cambridge connected by profession and/or age

b. 1870., Military Commander
b. 1603., Politician
b. 1603., Politician
b. 1599., Physician
b. 1600., Writer
b. 1604., Writer
b. 1603., Botanist

Employments

Company Founded Positions
University of Oxford
Official site
Other people associated with University of Oxford
Religious Leader
Organization founder

Organizations founded

1. New Model Army

Armed Force

Wikiedia article

The New Model Army of England was formed in 1645 by the Parliamentarians in the English Civil War, and was disbanded in 1660 after the Restoration. It differed from other armies in the series of civil wars referred to as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms in that it was intended as an army liable for service anywhere in the country, rather than being tied to a single area or garrison. Its soldiers became full-time professionals, rather than part-time militia. To establish a professional officer corps, the army's leaders were prohibited from having seats in either the House of Lords or House of Commons. This was to encourage their separation from the political or religious factions among the Parliamentarians. The New Model Army was raised partly from among veteran soldiers who already had deeply held Puritan religious convictions, and partly from conscripts who brought with them many commonly held beliefs about religion or society. Many of its common soldiers therefore held Dissenting or radical views unique among English armies.

Military conflicts participated

Battle of Worcester

Started

September 3rd, 1651

Ended

September 3rd, 1651

Wikipedia article

The Battle of Worcester took place on 3 September 1651 at Worcester, England, and was the final battle of the English Civil War. Oliver Cromwell and the Parliamentarians defeated the Royalist, predominantly Scottish, forces of King Charles II. The 16,000 Royalist forces were overwhelmed by the 28,000 strong "New Model Army" of Cromwell.

Battle of Dunbar

Started

September 3rd, 1650

Ended

September 3rd, 1650

Wikipedia article

The Battle of Dunbar was a battle of the Third English Civil War. The English Parliamentarian forces under Oliver Cromwell defeated a Scottish army commanded by David Leslie which was loyal to King Charles II, who had been proclaimed King of Scots on 5 February 1649. The battlefield has been inventoried and protected by Historic Scotland under the Historic Environment Act 2011.

Commanders

Battle of Preston

Started

August 17th, 1648

Ended

August 19th, 1648

Wikipedia article

The Battle of Preston, fought largely at Walton-le-Dale near Preston in Lancashire, resulted in a victory for the New Model Army under the command of Oliver Cromwell over the Royalists and Scots commanded by the Duke of Hamilton. The Parliamentarian victory presaged the end of the Second English Civil War.

Commanders

Battle of Langport

Started

July 10th, 1645

Ended

July 10th, 1645

Wikipedia article

The Battle of Langport was a Parliamentarian victory late in the First English Civil War which destroyed the last Royalist field army and gave Parliament control of the West of England, which had hitherto been a major source of manpower, raw materials and imports for the Royalists. The battle took place on 10 July 1645 near the small town of Langport, which lies south of Bristol.

Battle of Naseby

Started

June 14th, 1645

Ended

Wikipedia article

The Battle of Naseby was the decisive battle of the first English Civil War. On 14 June 1645, near the village of Naseby in Northamptonshire, the main army of King Charles I was destroyed by the Parliamentarian New Model Army commanded by Sir Thomas Fairfax and Oliver Cromwell.

Second Battle of Newbury

Started

October 27th, 1644

Ended

October 27th, 1644

Wikipedia article

The Second Battle of Newbury was a battle of the English Civil War fought on 27 October 1644, in Speen, adjoining Newbury in Berkshire. The battle was fought close to the site of the First Battle of Newbury, which took place in late September the previous year. The combined armies of Parliament inflicted a tactical defeat on the Royalists, but failed to gain any strategic advantage.

Battle of Marston Moor

Started

July 2nd, 1644

Ended

July 2nd, 1644

Wikipedia article

The Battle of Marston Moor was fought on 2 July 1644, during the First English Civil War of 1642–1646. The combined forces of the English Parliamentarians under Lord Fairfax and the Earl of Manchester and the Scottish Covenanters under the Earl of Leven defeated the Royalists commanded by Prince Rupert of the Rhine and the Marquess of Newcastle. During the summer of 1644, the Covenanters and Parliamentarians had been besieging York, which was defended by the Marquess of Newcastle. Prince Rupert had gathered an army which marched through the northwest of England, gathering reinforcements and fresh recruits on the way, and across the Pennines to relieve the city. The convergence of these forces made the ensuing battle the largest of the Civil Wars. On 1 July, Rupert outmanoeuvred the Covenanters and Parliamentarians to relieve the city. The next day, he sought battle with them even though he was outnumbered. He was dissuaded from attacking immediately and during the day both sides gathered their full strength on Marston Moor, an expanse of wild meadow west of York. Towards evening, the Covenanters and Parliamentarians themselves launched a surprise attack.

Battle of Gainsborough

Started

July 20th, 1643

Ended

July 20th, 1643

Wikipedia article

The Battle of Gainsborough was a battle in the English Civil War, fought on 28 July 1643.

Commanders

As movie subject

Title Year Other subjects Budget Awards Producers Directors Writers External resources
To Kill a King
Biography,Drama,History
2003
English Civil War
USD 14.3M
Jenny Mayhew
Cromwell
Biography,Drama,History
1970
English Civil War
1

Written work

1.The letters and speeches of Oliver Cromwell

Editions Subjects Co-authors
1904. at London

Namesakes

1.Cromwell Museum

Museum
The Cromwell Museum in Huntingdon, England, is a museum containing collections exploring the life of Oliver Cromwell and to a lesser extent his son Richard Cromwell. Oliver Cromwell was born in Huntingdon in 1599 and lived there for more than half his life. The museum is located in the former grammar school building in which Cromwell received his early education. Founded in 1962, the museum contains significant artifacts, paintings and printed material relating to The Protectorate. The museum is run by the Cambridgeshire Libraries, Archives and Information Service, part of Cambridgeshire County Council.
Geolocation
52.33071,-0.18439

2.Cromwell Tower

Structure
Located in Opened
London, United Kingdom
1973

3.Cromwell's Castle

Location
Cromwell's Castle is a 17th-century fortification on the island of Tresco in the Isles of Scilly, built after the invasion of the Isles by Sir Robert Blake in 1651. It was further expanded in 1739 during the War of Jenkins' Ear.
Located in Geolocation
Cornwall
49.96218,-6.34952

4.Oliver's Island

Island
Oliver's Island is a small, heavily wooded river island, or ait, in the river Thames in England. It is located in the London Borough of Hounslow on the Tideway near Kew, and is opposite Strand-on-the-Green in Chiswick. The island derives its name from a story that Oliver Cromwell once took refuge on it, but there is almost certainly no truth in this story. It was called Strand Ayt until a century after the Civil War, by which time a myth had arisen that Cromwell had set up an intermittent headquarters at the Bull’s Head at Strand on the Green. The story was embellished with the suggestion that a secret tunnel connected the island to the inn, but no evidence of any tunnel has ever been found. In 1777 the City of London's navigation committee installed a tollbooth on Oliver’s Island to levy charges on passing craft to fund improvements to the river’s navigability. This was a wooden structure in the shape of a small castle, and a barge was moored alongside, from which the tolls were taken. The “City Barge” gave its name to the inn at Strand on the Green. Successor barges were often stationed here to collect tolls until a dock was built on the Surrey shore.
Located in Geolocation
United Kingdom
51.485,-0.281111

Quotations

about approval

Do not trust to the cheering, for those persons would shout as much if you and I were going to be hanged.

about army and navy

I had rather have a plain, russet-coated Captain, that knows what he fights for, and loves what he knows, than that which you call a Gentle-man and is nothing else.

about deception

Subtlety may deceive you; integrity never will.

about getting ahead

No man rises so high as he knows not whither he goes.

about history and historians

What is all our histories, but God showing himself, shaking and trampling on everything that he has not planted.

about honesty

A few honest men are better than numbers.

about mistakes

I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ, think it possible you may be mistaken.

about necessity

Necessity has no law.

about opportunity

Make the iron hot by striking it.

about parliament

You have sat too long for any good you have been doing. Depart, I say, and let us have done with you. In the name of God, go!

about portraits

Mr. Lely, I desire you would use all your skill to paint my picture truly like me, and not flatter me at all; but remark all these roughnesses, pimples, warts, and everything as you see me, otherwise I will never pay a farthing for it.

about public office

The State, in choosing men to serve it, takes no notice of their opinions. If they be willing faithfully to serve it, that satisfies.

about self improvement

He who stops being better stops being good.

about trust

Put your trust in God and keep your powder dry.

Wikipedia

Check Oliver Cromwell on wikipedia.

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