Roger Sherman Baldwin U.S. Congressperson

Roger sherman baldwin

Roger Sherman Baldwin (January 4, 1793 – February 19, 1863) was an American lawyer involved in the Amistad case, who later became the 32nd Governor of Connecticut and a United States Senator. Baldwin was son of Simeon Baldwin and Rebecca Sherman in New Haven, Connecticut. He was the maternal grandson of notable founding father Roger Sherman (the only person to sign all four great state papers of the U.S.: the Continental Association, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution). He attended Hopkins School, and entered Yale College at the age of fourteen, and graduated with high honors in 1811. After leaving Yale he studied law in his father's office in New Haven, and also in the Litchfield Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1814. Although repeatedly called into public office, he devoted himself through life to the profession of his choice, attaining the highest distinction, especially in the discussion of questions of law. His defense in 1841, of the rights of the Africans of the Amistad, is celebrated both on account of its marked ability, and also because of the peculiar interest which was felt in these unfortunate captives.

Personal details

Date of birth
January 4th, 1793
Nationality
United States of America
Date of death
February 19th, 1863 at age of 70
Place of death
New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America

Family

Parents
Spouse
Children

Education

1. Litchfield Law School Educational Institution Campus

The Litchfield Law School of Litchfield, Connecticut, was the second formal school offering training for the legal profession founded in the United States of America, after the William & Mary School of Law. It was established in 1784 by Tapping Reeve, who would later became the Chief Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court. By the time the school closed in 1833, over 1,100 young men from throughout the country had attended, many of whom went on to have significant influence on political, economic, and legal development of the United States during the antebellum period. Some of the school's most notable students include John C. Calhoun and Aaron Burr.

Headquarters
82 South Street, 06759 - Litchfield, Connecticut
Wikipedia article

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by party membership

People attended Litchfield Law School connected by profession and/or age

b. 1789., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1796., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1796., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1798., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1790., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1798., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1791., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1789., U.S. Congressperson

2. Yale College Colleges/University

Yale College was the official name of Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, from 1718 to 1887. The name now refers to the undergraduate part of the university. Each undergraduate student is assigned to one of 12 residential colleges. Yale was founded in part from funds realized from the sale of Equivalent Lands.

Headquarters
55 Whitney Ave., Suite 630, 06510 - New Haven, Connecticut
Undergraduates
2013. 5,409
Acceptance rate
2013. 6.9 %
Local tuition
2014. 45.8 K $
Wikipedia article

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by career
Notable alumni by gender
Notable alumni by party membership

People attended Yale College connected by profession and/or age

b. 1792., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1791., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1791., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1794., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1795., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1798., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1798., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1791., U.S. Congressperson

3. Yale University Colleges/University

Yale University is an American private Ivy League research university located in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701 in the Colony of Connecticut, the university is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States.

Institution info

Type Private university
Endowment
2013. 20.8 bil. $
2012. 19.3 bil. $
Institution colors
Founded
1701
Headquarters
246 Church Street, 06520 - New Haven, Connecticut
Undergraduates
2012. 5,379
2010. 5,310
2009. 5,270
Postgraduates
2012. 6,501
2011. 6,318
2010. 6,391
Acceptance rate
2014. 6.26 %
2012. 7.1 %
2012. 6.8 %
2010. 8.0 %
Local tuition
2013. 44 K $
2012. 42.3 K $
2011. 40.5 K $
2010. 38.3 K $
Official web page www.yale.edu
Wikipedia article
Social media

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by career
Notable alumni by gender
Notable alumni by party membership

People attended Yale University connected by profession and/or age

b. 1792., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1793., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1798., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1796., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1796., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1791., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1788., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1794., U.S. Congressperson

4. Hopkins School High school

The Hopkins School (formerly Hopkins Grammar School) is a private, college-preparatory, coeducational day school, located in New Haven, Connecticut.

Type High school
Institution colors
Founded
1660
Headquarters
986 Forest Road, 06515 - New Haven, Connecticut
Official web page www.hopkins.edu
Wikipedia article

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by party membership

People attended Hopkins School connected by profession and/or age

b. 1780., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1823., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1808., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1859., American football head coach
b. 1925., Organization leader
b. 1954., Law professor
b. 1827., Military Person
b. 1840., Politician

Political engagements

Republican Party

Party founded

1854

Geographic scope

United States of America

Ideology

Conservatism in the United States
Social conservatism
Conservatism
Economic liberalism

Founders

Official web page

Social media

Wikipedia article

The Republican Party, also commonly called the GOP, is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Democratic Party. Founded by anti-slavery activists in 1854, it dominated politics nationally for most of the period from 1860 to 1932. There have been 18 Republican presidents, the first being Abraham Lincoln, serving from 1861 to 1865, and the most recent being George W. Bush, serving from 2001 to 2009. The most recent Republican presidential nominee was former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney in 2012. The party's platform is generally based upon American conservatism, in contrast to the Democratic Party, which supports contemporary American liberalism. The Republican Party's platform of conservatism traces its roots to classical liberalism with an emphasis on its economically liberal policies in supporting free markets, limited government, and laissez-faire economics, while supporting socially conservative policies. A significant portion of the Republican base is made up of fiscal conservatives and other free market, pro-capitalism factions.

Other members

born 1787
born 1791
born 1792
born 1792
born 1794
born 1794
born 1795

Whig Party

Geographic scope

United States of America

Ideology

Economic liberalism
Social conservatism

Founders

Wikipedia article

The Whig Party was a political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States of America. Four Presidents of the United States were members of the Whig Party. Considered integral to the Second Party System and operating from the early 1830s to the mid-1850s, the party was formed in opposition to the policies of President Andrew Jackson and his Democratic Party. In particular, the Whigs supported the supremacy of Congress over the Presidency and favored a program of modernization and economic protectionism. This name was chosen to echo the American Whigs of 1776, who fought for independence, and because "Whig" was then a widely recognized label of choice for people who identified as opposing tyranny. The Whig Party counted among its members such national political luminaries as Daniel Webster, William Henry Harrison, and their preeminent leader, Henry Clay of Kentucky. In addition to Harrison, the Whig Party also nominated war hero generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. In its two decades of existence, the Whig Party had two of its candidates, William Henry Harrison and Zachary Taylor, elected President. Both died in office.

Other members

born 1792
born 1792
born 1792
born 1792
born 1794
born 1794
born 1794
born 1794

Goverment positions 2

Governor of Connecticut

1844-1846

Jurdistiction

Connecticut

Other position holders

1834-1835
1835-1838
1846-1847
1847-1849
1849-1850
1850-1853

United States Senator

1847-1851

Legislative sessions

30th United States Congress
31st United States Congress

Area represented

Connecticut

Jurdistiction

United States of America

The 50 states elect 2 senators each for staggered 6-year terms. A senator represents between 1 and 37 million people, depending on their state’s population. The day-to-day activities of the Senate are controlled largely by the political party holding the most seats, called the "majority party".

Other position holders

1846-1859
1846-1857
1848-1848
1848-1857
1848-1849
1848-1853

Written work

1.Opinion of the Hon. R. S. Baldwin

Editions Subjects Co-authors
1856. at New York City

Wikipedia

Check Roger Sherman Baldwin on wikipedia.

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