Samuel L. Southard U.S. Congressperson

Samuel l southard

Samuel Lewis Southard (June 9, 1787 – June 26, 1842) was a prominent U.S. statesman of the early 19th century, serving as a U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Navy, and the tenth Governor of New Jersey. The son of Henry Southard and brother of Isaac Southard, he was born in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, attended the Brick Academy classical school and graduated from Princeton University in 1804. He is descended from one of the earliest settlers of New Amsterdam, Anthony Janszoon van Salee. After teaching school in New Jersey, he worked for several years as a tutor in Virginia and studied law there. Upon being admitted to the bar, he returned to New Jersey, where he was appointed law reporter by the New Jersey Legislature in 1814. Elected to the New Jersey General Assembly in 1815, Southard was appointed to the New Jersey Supreme Court to succeed Mahlon Dickerson shortly thereafter, and in 1820 served as a presidential elector. He was elected to a seat in the United States Senate over James J. Wilson and was appointed to the remainder of Wilson's term when he resigned, and served in office from January 26, 1821, to March 4, 1823 when Southard himself resigned.

Personal details

Date of birth
June 9th, 1787
Nationality
United States of America
Date of death
June 26th, 1842 at age of 55
Place of death
Fredericksburg
Religion
Presbyterianism

Family

Parents
Siblings
Spouse

Education

1. Princeton University Colleges/University

Princeton University is a private research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, United States.

Institution info

Type Private university
Endowment
2013. 17.7 bil. $
2011. 17.1 bil. $
Institution colors
Founded
1746
Headquarters
1 Nassau Hall, 08544 - Princeton, New Jersey
Undergraduates
2013. 5,323
2012. 5,336
2011. 5,249
2010. 5,142
2009. 5,069
Postgraduates
2013. 2,691
2012. 2,674
2011. 2,610
2010. 2,582
Acceptance rate
2014. 7.28 %
2013. 7.29 %
2012. 7.4 %
2012. 8.5 %
2010. 8.0 %
Local tuition
2013. 40.2 K $
2012. 39.5 K $
2010. 36.6 K $
Official web page www.princeton.edu
Wikipedia article
Social media

Institution social analysis

Notable alumni by career
Notable alumni by gender
Notable alumni by party membership

People attended Princeton University connected by profession and/or age

b. 1792., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1790., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1791., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1787., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1791., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1783., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1787., U.S. Congressperson
b. 1786., U.S. Congressperson

Political engagements

Whig Party

Geographic scope

United States of America

Ideology

Economic liberalism
Social conservatism

Founders

Wikipedia article

The Whig Party was a political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States of America. Four Presidents of the United States were members of the Whig Party. Considered integral to the Second Party System and operating from the early 1830s to the mid-1850s, the party was formed in opposition to the policies of President Andrew Jackson and his Democratic Party. In particular, the Whigs supported the supremacy of Congress over the Presidency and favored a program of modernization and economic protectionism. This name was chosen to echo the American Whigs of 1776, who fought for independence, and because "Whig" was then a widely recognized label of choice for people who identified as opposing tyranny. The Whig Party counted among its members such national political luminaries as Daniel Webster, William Henry Harrison, and their preeminent leader, Henry Clay of Kentucky. In addition to Harrison, the Whig Party also nominated war hero generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. In its two decades of existence, the Whig Party had two of its candidates, William Henry Harrison and Zachary Taylor, elected President. Both died in office.

Other members

born 1786
born 1786
born 1786
born 1788
born 1788

Democratic-Republican Party

Geographic scope

United States of America

Ideology

Republicanism
Nationalism
Federalism

Founders

Wikipedia article

The term "Democratic-Republican Party", is the name used primarily by modern political scientists for the first "Republican Party", also known as the "Jeffersonian Republicans." Historians usually use "Republican Party." It was the second political party in the United States, and was organized by then United States Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson and his friend and compatriot James Madison, in 1791-93, to oppose the Federalist Party run by Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton. The new party controlled the Presidency and Congress, and most states, from 1801 to 1825, during the First Party System. Starting about 1791 one faction in Congress, many of whom had been opposed to the new Constitution, began calling themselves Republicans in the Second United States Congress. People at the time used the name Republican in mentioning the Republican Party of this period and the first two decades of the 19th Century. The Republican Party split after the 1824 presidential election into two parties: the Democratic Party and the short-lived National Republican Party.

Other members

born 1786
born 1786
born 1786
born 1786
born 1788
born 1788

National Republican Party

Geographic scope

United States of America

Ideology

Liberalism

Wikipedia article

The National Republicans were a political party in the United States. During the administration of John Quincy Adams, the president's supporters were referred to as Adams Men or Anti-Jackson. When Andrew Jackson was elected President of the United States in 1828, this group went into opposition. The use of the term "National Republican" dates from 1830. Before the elevation of John Quincy Adams to the presidency in 1825, the Democratic-Republican Party, which had been the only national American political party for over a decade, began to fracture, losing its infrastructure and identity. Its caucuses no longer met to select candidates because now they had separate interests. After the 1824 election, factions developed in support of Adams and in support of Andrew Jackson. Adams politicians, including most ex-Federalists, would gradually evolve into the National Republican party, and those politicians that supported Jackson would later help form the modern Democratic Party. The ad hoc coalition that supported John Quincy Adams fell apart after his defeat for reelection in 1828.

Other members

born 1785
born 1786
born 1786
born 1786
born 1788
born 1792
born 1793
born 1796

Goverment positions 2

United States Senator

1821-1823
1833-1842

Legislative sessions

16th United States Congress
17th United States Congress
23rd United States Congress
24th United States Congress
25th United States Congress
26th United States Congress
27th United States Congress

Area represented

New Jersey

Jurdistiction

United States of America

The 50 states elect 2 senators each for staggered 6-year terms. A senator represents between 1 and 37 million people, depending on their state’s population. The day-to-day activities of the Senate are controlled largely by the political party holding the most seats, called the "majority party".

Other position holders

1820-1829
1820-1827
1820-1825
1820-1825
1822-1826
1822-1825

Governor of New Jersey

1832-1833

Jurdistiction

New Jersey

Official web page

The Office of the Governor of New Jersey is head of the executive branch for the U.S. state of New Jersey. The office of governor is an elected position, for which elected officials serve four-year terms. Governors cannot be elected to more than two consecutive terms, but there is no limit on the total number of terms they may serve. The official residence for the governor is Drumthwacket, a mansion located in Princeton, New Jersey; the office of the governor is at the New Jersey State House in Trenton. The first Governor of New Jersey was William Livingston, who served from August 31, 1776 to July 25, 1790. The current governor is Chris Christie, who assumed office on January 19, 2010, and was elected for his second term on November 5, 2013.

Other position holders

1815-1817
1829-1832
1833-1833
1836-1837
1837-1843
1843-1845

Wikipedia

Check Samuel L. Southard on wikipedia.

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